The World’s Oldest Crown 
The crown was discovered in a remote cave in the Judaean Desert near the Dead Sea in 1961 among hundreds of other objects from the period. Known as the ‘Nahal Mishar Hoard’, more than 400 objects were discovered by Pessah Bar-Adon and his fellow Israeli archaeologists in the cave which became known as the ‘Cave of the Treasure’. The ancient relic, which dates back to the Copper Age between 4000–3300 B.C., is shaped like a thick ring and features vultures and doors protruding from the top. It is believed the crown played a part in burial ceremonies for people of importance at the time. 
(source)

The World’s Oldest Crown

The crown was discovered in a remote cave in the Judaean Desert near the Dead Sea in 1961 among hundreds of other objects from the period. Known as the ‘Nahal Mishar Hoard’, more than 400 objects were discovered by Pessah Bar-Adon and his fellow Israeli archaeologists in the cave which became known as the ‘Cave of the Treasure’. The ancient relic, which dates back to the Copper Age between 4000–3300 B.C., is shaped like a thick ring and features vultures and doors protruding from the top. It is believed the crown played a part in burial ceremonies for people of importance at the time.

(source)

forensicimagination:


“I’d like to use whatever time I have left to help set a pattern in our community of going back to really traditional and natural ways of handling our dead,” says Clark Wang, the central figure of the film.Diagnosed with lymphoma, Wang has his coffin built from reclaimed wood, learns about the washing by hand that his partner Jane Ezzard will carry out on his corpse, and visits the Pine Forest Memorial Gardens in Wake Forest, North Carolina. There he hopes that his death will help preserve a section of woods from being razed by turning it into a green burial section of the cemetery.
“I think what people really want to know is that their last act isn’t contributing to the pollution of the planet and maybe in some way is helping to heal it,” says Joe Sehee, founder of the Green Burial Council, in the film. Billy Campbell, cofounder of Ramsey Creek in South Carolina, the first conservation cemetery, later adds: “The best examples of tall grass prairie left in places like Iowa are all cemeteries […] If by accident a cemetery can save significant biodiversity elements, why couldn’t you do it by design?”

(via Saving the Environment One Death at a Time)
The movie is running at Village East Cinema NYC from August 15 to 21.

forensicimagination:

“I’d like to use whatever time I have left to help set a pattern in our community of going back to really traditional and natural ways of handling our dead,” says Clark Wang, the central figure of the film.Diagnosed with lymphoma, Wang has his coffin built from reclaimed wood, learns about the washing by hand that his partner Jane Ezzard will carry out on his corpse, and visits the Pine Forest Memorial Gardens in Wake Forest, North Carolina. There he hopes that his death will help preserve a section of woods from being razed by turning it into a green burial section of the cemetery.

“I think what people really want to know is that their last act isn’t contributing to the pollution of the planet and maybe in some way is helping to heal it,” says Joe Sehee, founder of the Green Burial Council, in the film. Billy Campbell, cofounder of Ramsey Creek in South Carolina, the first conservation cemetery, later adds: “The best examples of tall grass prairie left in places like Iowa are all cemeteries […] If by accident a cemetery can save significant biodiversity elements, why couldn’t you do it by design?”

(via Saving the Environment One Death at a Time)

The movie is running at Village East Cinema NYC from August 15 to 21.